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FAQ

 

 

What does PV mean?

PV is a short term for Photovoltaic. This is a breakthrough technology where solar cells convert sunlight into electricity.

 

What are the main types of solar panels in use today?

The three main types of solar panel technology are monocrystalline, polycrystalline and thin film.
Currently, the most efficient solar technology is monocrystalline. The monocrystalline variety is a higher efficiency module and requires less space. Solargain systems are mostly all monocrystalline depending on the conditions.
Detailed information about the types of solar technology is listed below:

Mono crystalline (monocrystalline c-Si)
Mono Panel
A single crystal or monocrystalline solid is a material in which the crystal lattice of the entire sample is continuous and unbroken to the edges of the sample, with no grain boundaries. The absence of the defects associated with grain boundaries can give monocrystals unique properties, particularly mechanical, optical and electrical. This structure is what makes certain types of gems precious.

Monocrystalline panels are proven technology that has been in use for over 50 years. They have the highest efficiency of up to 12% - 19.5% (the record stands at 25% efficiency in laboratory conditions). This means less panels can be used to attain an output goal.

Poly crystalline (polycrystalline c-Si)
Poly Panel

Polycrystalline
materials are solids that are composed of many crystallites of varying size and orientation. The variation in direction can be random. Fibre texture is an example of the latter.
Almost all common metals, and many ceramics are polycrystalline.

A photo of electrical steel (coating removed) showing polycrystalline structure (Source Wikipedia)

 

This technology is comparable the mono crystalline variety, but for the structure of the materials at a molecular level. This makes the efficiency slightly lower at approximately 11-13%. This technology is now quite dated and the use of monocrystalline is preferred from a performance perspective.

Thin Film

The most common varieties of Thin Film panels are:

• Cadmium Telluride Thin-Film panels (CdTe)
• Copper Indium Gallium Selenide Thin-Film panels (CIGS)
• Amorphous silicon Thin-Film panels(a-Si)

Thin film (Rigid)

In rigid thin film modules, the cell and the module are manufactured in the same production line.
The cell is created on a glass substrate or superstrate, and the electrical connections are created in situ, a so called "monolithic integration". The substrate or superstrate is laminated with an encapsulant to a front or back sheet, usually another sheet of glass. The typically has a sunlight conversion rate of 6-12% and tends to perform better in lower light zones such as northern Europe.

Thin film (Flexible)
Flexible thin film cells and modules are created on the same production line by depositing the photoactive layer and other necessary layers on a flexible substrate. The typically has a sunlight conversion rate of 6-12%. The University of Michigan's solar car that won the North American Solar Challenge in July 2008 used IMM thin-film flexible solar cells.

 

What affects the energy output of my solar system?

There are many aspects that affect the output of your solar system.

A solar power system is not always going to give the same power output.
The following information outlines some of the factors:

  • Orientation of the solar panels (north facing being ideal)
  • Efficiency of the Inverter
  • Efficiency of the modules
  • The season and weather, time of day
  • Temperature of the panels
  • Shading, dirt or dust
  • Your geographical location (refer to the CEC table refer: How much power do solar panels they generate?)

Warranties and Guarantee

Solar PV panels generally come with a performance warranty that can last up to 25 years. Additionally, a manufacturing warranty will generally span 5-10 years.
As all system are not the same, please call Solargain on 1300 73 93 55 for information about the warranty of the system you desire.

Australian Standards
All Solargain systems meet the required Australian standards.

The Clean Energy Council has a frequently updated list of all solar panel and inverter models that meet Australian standards. To see the list, please http://www.solaraccreditation.com.au/acccec/approvedproducts.html.
Solar PV systems must also comply with The CEC Design and Installation Guidelines.

 

What are the optimum conditions for a solar system to operate?

The maximum output is given with a high light intensity and the biggest surface area of solar cell panels, and with no tilt in relation to the light source.

Heat can also affect the energy output of your system. As temperature of your solar panels rise, it will lower the overall energy output. An ideal situation would be that the panels would track and remain perpendicular to the light source. This can however be expensive so the solution is to have your panels facing as north as possible north. The ideal tilt of your panels should be 30 degrees, as specified by the Australian Clean Energy Council. If your roof tilt is inadequate for optimum performance, Solargain is capable of engineering a mounting system that is perfect for your situation.

 

How much sunlight should the panels receive

The amount of energy in sunlight that a solar PV panel receives over a day is expressed in peak sun hours. As the amount of energy generated by a panel is directly proportional to the amount of energy it receives from sunlight, it is important to install panels so they receive maximum sunlight.

Your Solargain solar energy specialist can calculate the amount of energy generated by the solar PV panel from the peak sun hours available. Peak sun hours vary throughout the year.

Yield estimates can be obtained from Solargain during the quotation process.

How much energy does a Solargain Energy System generate?

The output of a solar PV system depends on its size. The most common household systems are either 1.5 kW to 3kW systems, although some property owners have installed systems of up to 10 kilowatts. The table below shows the average daily production of some common grid-connected systems throughout Australia.

Average Daily Production

City

1 kW system

1.5 kW system

2.0 kW system

3.0 kW system

4.0 kW system

Adelaide

4.2 kWh

6.3 kWh

8.4 kWh

12.6 kWh

16.8 kWh

Alice Springs

5.0 kWh

7.5 kWh

10.0 kWh

15.0 kWh

20.0 kWh

Brisbane

4.2 kWh

6.3 kWh

8.4 kWh

12.6 kWh

16.8 kWh

Cairns

4.2 kWh

6.3 kWh

8.4 kWh

12.6 kWh

16.8 kWh

Canberra

4.3 kWh

6.45 kWh

8.6 kWh

12.9 kWh

17.2 kWh

Darwin

4.4 kWh

6.6 kWh

8.8 kWh

13.2 kWh

17.6 kWh

Hobart

3.5 kWh

5.25 kWh

7.0 kWh

10.5 kWh

14.0 kWh

Melbourne

3.6 kWh

5.4 kWh

7.2 kWh

10.8 kWh

14.4 kWh

Perth

4.4 kWh

6.6 kWh

8.8 kWh

13.2 kWh

17.6 kWh

Sydney

3.9 kWh

5.85 kWh

7.8 kWh

11.7 kWh

15.6 kWh

Data Source: PV-GC spreadsheet based on the CEC GC Design Guidelines The rated output is that achieved in perfect laboratory conditions. The CEC design summary software takes these deratings into account when predicting average for any given system.

A typical Australian house consumes around 18 kilowatt hours (kWh) per day so a 1-2kW system displaces an average of 25-40% of your average electricity bill. Solar panels produce more energy in summer than they do in winter.

Does shading affect the performance of the panels?

PV panels should ideally be in full sun from at least 9am to 3pm.
Solar panels obviously produce less power when they are shaded and should ideally be situated where there will never be any shadows on them.
There may be situations where this cannot be avoided, and the effects of partial shading should be considered.
A shadow falling on a small part of a panel can have a surprisingly large effect on output. Not only will the cells that are shaded be producing less power, but as the cells within a panel are normally all wired in series, the shaded cells affect the current flow of the whole panel.
If the affected panel is wired in series (in a string) with other panels, then the output of all those panels will be affected by the partial shading of one panel. Mounting solar panels away from trees or man-made obstacles like chimneys or taller buildings is a must for proper operation.

 

What is an inverter? What sort should I buy?

Solar PV panels produce low voltage DC electricity. The inverter converts this into the AC electricity needed to supply power for standard appliances.
The efficiency of an inverter is measured by how well it converts the DC electricity into AC electricity. This usually ranges from 95% to 97.5% for most models. Check the inverter’s specifications before you purchase. Inverters are sized according to the power (watts) they can supply.


Temperature
The amount of electricity a solar PV panel can generate is reduced as temperatures increase. Solar panels operate best at ambient temperatures up to 25°C. However, if the ambient temperature is higher, the panel’s output declines.

 

Is hail likely to damage my panels?

Not in any normal circumstance. The panels are tested to withstand hail. A hail test is conducted with a 25 mm diameter ice ball at 23 m/s (82km/h), directed at 11 impact locations.

How long will the process take to have my system installed and producing energy?

This will in particular depend on your meter change and grid connection which is done by your energy provider. This requirements and turn-around can change depending on the Australian State you are in.

Solargain can assist you with your application, but please note that a meter change is a component of the installation that is inevitably between you and your energy provider. This process can take up to two months before your new meter is installed by your energy provider and you start to receive any applicable feed in tariff.
The installation of the physical solar unit process itself can take between three hours up to one day, depending on your system size, location, safety factors and weather conditions.
You will be required to be present for part of the installation to sign relevant paperwork.

 

Will it cost money to change my meter over?

Yes. The Solargain sale price excludes the meter change and grid connection. This cost varies from state to state depending on the energy provider and type of meter.

 

Who arranges for the electrical inspector (currently VIC only) /meter change?

This is handled by your Solargain installer and is included in the sale price of your system.

 

When will my system be turned on?

Victoria: As soon as the system is inspected and the meter changed and/ or reprogrammed and connected to the grid.
WA and all others: Your system will function after the completion of the installation.

What happens if the grid power goes out?

The system will automatically shut down with a power outage and switch back on when power is restored. If your system does not switch on when the power is restored, please do not hesitate to contact the Solargain Service Department on 1300 73 93 55.

My system has been installed. What do I need to do now?

Solargain will provide you with the relevant system manuals. We suggest reading your manual to familiarize yourself with the system. Solargain also recommends continuing to monitor your system progress, and report back if you have any issues or questions.
Solargain also provide a service option to maintain your panels. Please enquire on 1300 73 93 55 if you are interested.

Who can I talk to if I need more information, or if I have a problem?

Call Solargain on 1300 73 93 55.

 

Should I keep and trade STCs myself?

No, STC’s are traded in commercial quantities and one off small trades are very difficult to find a purchaser for. If you could find a buyer there is also the complexity of registering the certificates and waiting for payment which makes the process cost and time prohibitive.

What government schemes are in place to lower the cost of purchasing a solar PV system?

There are currently three types of financial assistance offered for solar PV systems in
Australia:

•     Small-scale Technology Certificates (STCs)
•     Solar Credits
•     Feed-in tariffs

Small-scale Technology Certificates (STCs)

Small-scale Technology Certificates (STCs) are an electronic form of currency created by the Renewable Energy (Electricity) Act 2000 (also known as the RET scheme). One STC is equivalent to one megawatt hour of electricity generated by your solar PV power system. The price of STCs changes according to market conditions. As an owner of a solar PV power system, you can register, sell, trade or surrender STCs for systems up to 100kW.

There are two ways you can be paid for your STCs:

1.  Assign your STCs when you purchase your solar PV system to a registered agent in exchange for a financial benefit which may be in the form of a delayed cash payment or upfront discount on your solar PV panel system (most consumers take this
option); or

2.  Create the STCs yourself by finding a buyer and then selling and transferring them in the Renewable Energy Certificate (REC) Registry.

For a list of registered agents, contact the Clean Energy Regulator3.

STCs may be created for solar PV systems in batches of either one, five or 15 year deeming periods. At the beginning of each successive one or five year deeming period, the Regulator (from the Clean Energy Regulator) must be satisfied that your solar PV system  is still installed and is likely to remain functional for the next deeming period. In order to claim STCs for the full 15 year deeming period upfront – which is the most common option - your designer/installer must be accredited by the Clean Energy Council. More information is
available in the RET process for Owners of Small Generation Units (SGUs) guide published by
the Clean Energy Regulator click here.

The level of subsidy will depend on a number of factors, including the location (also known as the zone) of the solar PV system, the size of the system and the price of STCs at the time the system was installed.

The Australian Government has capped the price of STCs at $40 but the actual value of an
STC varies from day to day. STCs are traded on the STC market meaning the price will vary according to supply and demand. Over the past year the price of STCs has ranged between around $25 to $35. The Clean Energy Council website displays a current STC price on the homepage at cleanenergycouncil.org.au

Australia is divided up into various zones based on how much renewable energy can be generated by a solar panel in a given area. So the same sized system installed in Melbourne or Hobart (Zone 4) receives fewer STCs than those installed in Sydney (Zone 3) or Darwin (Zone 2) because Melbourne and Hobart have less sunshine so less solar energy is produced. The table below shows the level of financial support available from STCs on solar PV systems  in the major capital cities of Australia.

Small-scale Technology Certificates – Level of financial support

City

Zone

Rating

System
Size

Deeming Period

Total STC Entitlement

Total Subsidy

Adelaide

3

1.382

x 1.5 kW

x 15 (years)=

31

$992 (31 STCs x $32)

Brisbane

3

1.382

x 1.5 kW

x 15 (years)=

31

$992 (31 STCs x $32)

Canberra

3

1.382

x 1.5 kW

x 15 (years)=

31

$992 (31 STCs x $32)

Darwin

2

1.536

x 1.5 kW

x 15 (years)=

34

$1088 (34 STCs x $32)

Hobart

4

1.185

x 1.5 kW

x 15 (years)=

26

$832 (26 STCs x $32)

Melbourne

4

1.185

x 1.5 kW

x 15 (years)=

26

$832 (26 STCs x $32)

Perth

3

1.382

x 1.5 kW

x 15 (years)=

31

$992 (31 STCs x $32)

Sydney

3

1.382

x 1.5 kW

x 15 (years)=

31

$992 (31 STCs x $32)

Zone Rating x Rated Power Output (1.5kW) x Deeming Period (15 years) = Total STC Entitlement
Figures based on the $32 STC rate as at December 2012.This is an approximate rate and the STC price will vary.
For more information, contact the Clean Energy Regulator 5

Solar Credits

As of 1 January 2013, this section is only relevant for customers who meet the requirements as outlined below.

Only solar PV systems installed prior to 1 January 2013 are eligible to receive the solar credit multiplier. If an agreement was entered into prior to 16 November 2012, you have until 30
June 2013 for your system to be installed and still receive the solar credit multiplier. Further
details on solar credits can be found on the Department of Climate Change and Energy
Efficiency website6.

The Australian Government sets the level of the solar credits multiplier and reduces it over time reflecting reductions in the costs of rooftop solar panels. Changes are shown in the table below.

Multiplier for certificates for small generation units

Installation period

Number of multipliers

9 June 2009 to 30 June 2010

5 x

1 July 2010 to 30 June 2011

5 x

1 July 2011 to 30 June 2012

3 x

1 July 2012 to 31 December 2012

2 x

1 January 2013 onwards

1 (ie. no multiplier)

For example, Adelaide has an STC entitlement of 31 STCs for 1.5kW capacity (see Small- scale Technology Certificates – Level of financial support table on page 8). Under the solar credits multiplier, the first 1.5 kW is multiplied by 2 (31 x 2 = 62) and then an additional 31
STC’s is given for the remaining 1.5kW capacity (62 + 31 =93). The table below shows the

level of financial support that you would receive for installing a 3kW system using the current approximate STC price of $32 both with, and without, the solar credit multiplier.

Approximate level of support for 3kW system

 

2 x Solar Credits multiplier
(systems installed up to 31
December 2012)

No Solar Credits multiplier
(systems installed from 1 January
2013)

City

STCs

Approximate support

STCs

Approximate support

Adelaide

93

$2976

62

$1984

Brisbane

93

$2976

62

$1984

Canberra

93

$2976

62

$1984

Darwin

103

$3296

69

$2208

Hobart

79

$2528

53

$1696

Melbourne

79

$2528

53

$1696

Perth

93

$2976

62

$1984

Sydney

93

$2976

62

$1984

Source: Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency  7. Based on the STC price of $32 as at December 2012

Feed-in tariffs

Several states have introduced, or are in the process of introducing, feed-in tariffs. A feed-in tariff pays you for electricity generated by your solar PV system.

Under a net feed-in tariff, a premium is paid for any solar energy that goes back into the grid from your house. So if you have surplus energy generated by your solar panels, you get paid for it; and if you use all of the energy you generate it will be offset against your normal electricity bill.

Under a gross feed-in tariff you get paid for every unit of electricity generated by your solar panels, regardless of whether it goes into the grid or is used by your household.

You need to apply to your electricity retailer to receive the feed-in tariff. When signing an agreement with your electricity retailer, you need to be informed. In particular, you should check with your electricity retailer about any tariff changes that will occur as a result of installing solar and carefully weigh up the advantages and disadvantages before making a decision. This should be considered before you install tariff changes.

Important questions to ask about your feed-in tariff agreement include:

  • What price will they pay you for your electricity (in cents per kWh)?
  • What is the cost of the electricity you purchase from them (in cents per kWh)?
  • Will you lose your lower off-peak rates by moving onto a higher Time of Use (TOU) tariff?
  • What will be the form of payment for electricity you produce? It is likely you will receive the feed-in tariffs you earn by default as a credit on your electricity bill rather than cash.
  • What will be the form of payment for surplus electricity you produce? Will it be cash, cheque or EFT on request?

Other important questions to ask when signing an agreement with your electricity retailer are discussed in further detail later in this document.

The table below shows the feed-in tariffs introduced, or in the process of being introduced,
in the various states, and the savings that could be made on a 1.5 kW system. These savings are an estimate only and may vary depending on the size of your solar PV system, the products used, location of the system and how much electricity your household consumes. The actual savings you make may also vary depending on the electricity retailer you are with. For a more accurate estimate, your accredited designer/installer will be able to calculate
your potential savings as part of their load analysis.

1.5 kW system under the feed-in tariff schemes*

Location

Scheme name

Scheme type

Scheme nature

2012/2013 scheme rate

Based on 5% of electricity being fed into the grid

Based on 25% of electricity being fed into the grid

Based on 50% of electricity being fed into the grid

Annual FiT value

Annual FiT & offset value

Annual FiT value

Annual FiT & offset value

Annual FiT value

Annual FiT & offset value

Victoria

New Standard FiT

Net
export FiT

Mandatory

8c per kWh

$8

$433

$39

$375

$79

$303

South
Australia

FiT and FiT Premium

Net export

Mandatory

26c per kWh

$30

$613

$148

$609

$297

$604

Queensland*

Solar Bonus Scheme*

Net
Export FiT

Mandatory

44c per kWh

$51

$605

$253

$691

$506

$798

Queensland

Solar Bonus Scheme

Net
Export FiT

Mandatory
+ Voluntary

16c per kWh

$18

$573

$92

$530

$184

$476

Queensland

Solar Bonus Scheme

Net
Export FiT

Mandatory

8c per kWh

$9

$564

$ 46

$484

$92

$384

Western
Australia

Horizon FiT
+ REBs

Net
Export FiT

Mandatory
+ Voluntary

50c per kWh

$60

$664

$301

$778

$ 602

$920

Western
Australia

Synergy FiT
+ REBs

Net
Export FiT

Mandatory
+ Voluntary

25c per kWh

$30

$634

$151

$628

$301

$619

Western
Australia

Renewable Energy Buyback Scheme (REBs)

Net
Export FiT

Mandatory

8c per kWh

$10

$614

$ 51

$528

$101

$419

Australian Capital Territory

Net metering

Net 1:1
FiT

Voluntary

18c per kWh

$21

$421

$105

$421

$ 211

$421

Northern
Territory

Gross Generation Rate

Gross
Export FiT

Voluntary

22c per kWh

$523

$523

$523

$ 523

$523

$523

Tasmania

Net metering

Net 1:1
FiT

Voluntary

25c per kWh

$24

$485

$121

$485

$242

$485

New South
Wales

Maximum
Benchmark

Net
Export

Voluntary

13c per kWh

$9

$566

$43

$483

$85

$379

New South
Wales

Minimum
Benchmark

Net
Export

Voluntary

5c per kWh

$5

$563

$27

$467

$53

$347

* This rate is now closed to new applicants

Disclaimer:
The above table provides an indicative example of the value from exported and offset energy that could be expected in average conditions, based on average rates, for the Average Australian house.

Solar generation statistics are in accordance with Clean Energy Council estimates for the regions described but can be expected to vary depending on your precise location and situation. Feed in tariffs are in accordance with latest published data as at August 2012 from various providers. Please note that some electricity providers may provide more or less than the rates described in the table.

Electricity offset savings  are based on 2012/2013 price data from the Australian Energy Market Commission (AEMC), or State bodies where significant variations to rates occurred subsequent to the publication of the AEMC report. Please note that a significant and constantly changing variety of offers for electricity prices exists and may affect the outcomes represented in the table All electricity rates exclude GST and daily charges which will have an impact on the outcomes. Household energy consumption is based on the Average Australian level of 17kWh/day, based on the AEMC report.

Please note that many of the schemes described have caps, end dates and/or are subject to change and as such you will need to check on the availability of these offers when you apply. It is also important to note that some electricity retailers may, depending on the tariff structure you are on, offer higher or lower rates for solar energy you produce to offset your bill and/or export to the grid. In States where solar offers are voluntary, there is no obligation to provide a solar offer although in most cases offers do exist and those represented on the table are indicative of common rates. Some States have offers that are a combination of voluntary and mandatory rates. Eligibility rules apply in virtually all circumstances and you will therefore need to ensure you are eligible before proceeding.

Please note that whilst we have endeavoured to provide a sound indication of typical situations around Australia, your individual situation is likely to differ from these and you should consult with your electricity and service providers to ascertain your particular outcome.

These rates are residential offers only and do not relate to offers available for commercial customers.

For more information on feed-in tariffs contact your relevant state government department:

State Government Departments

State

Department

Contact

ACT

Department of Environment, Climate Change, Energy & Water

 

13 22 81

NSW

Department of Industry & Investment

 

1300 136 888

NT

Department of the Chief
Minister

 

08 8999 5511

QLD

Office of Clean Energy

13 25 23

SA

Sustainability & Climate Change

08 8204 2999

TAS

Department of Infrastructure, Energy & Resources

 

1300 135 513

VIC

Department of Primary
Industries

 

136 186

WA

Office of Energy

08 9420 5600

Can you explain what STC / RECs is?

Basically, an STC is a form of renewable energy currency -  a kind of carbon credit that represents a unit of renewable energy. One STC is equivalent to one megawatt hour of electricity generation over a 15 year period.

 

How many STCs will I receive?

In most circumstances, Solargain will receive the STCs and thereby reduce the overall cost of your solar system. Solargain prices all our systems with this in mind.

The number of STCs you are awarded depends on how many megawatts of power your renewable energy system is expected to produce or offset over this 15 year period. For example, a 1 kilowatt (kW) solar power system installed in Melbourne is expected to generate 18 megawatts (mW) of electricity over a 15 year period. Therefore, 18 STCs are awarded by installing a 1kW system in Melbourne.
Thanks to the Solar Credits Scheme, most households and businesses are eligible for a multiplied number STC’s for the first 1.5kW of solar power they install.

 

How much are STCs worth?

STC’s are a tradable commodity similar to a share. Just like shares that you would trade on the stock exchange, the price of STC’s fluctuate depending on supply and demand.

 

Why would anyone buy STCs?

Businesses buy STC’s from the open market as a form of carbon offset. In general, Australian legislation requires businesses that produce carbon (e.g. Energy Providers) to offset this by purchasing STC certificates.

 

How do STC’s reduce the cost of a system?

The STC's you receive with your system are not worth anything to you, unless you choose to sell them - and trading STC’s is a tricky and convoluted business. That's why solar households generally choose to sell their STC’s to their solar installer. Solargain will then give you a discount off the price of your system in exchange for these STC’s. How much of a discount you get from handing over your STCs depends on the current market trading value of STC’s.

 

Why would I keep, or retire my STCs?

Solargain recommend that the most advantageous option is to surrender the full amount of STC’s at the point of purchase to get the full discount on the system.

You are however entitled to keep your STC’s if you are willing to pay the full amount of the Solar System. You can then hold onto your STCs and see if the value goes up in the future (note: the value can and has gone down in the past). The choice is yours.
Please note: small amounts of STC’s can be difficult to sell in the open marked. You also need to be a registered STC trader.

At present, there is a federal Australian national initiative that has commissioned an STC clearing house for people who wish to put their STC’s up for trade at a capped price of $40. There are issues with this as the open market usually sells for less and you may again find it difficult to sell them. Again, the choice is yours.

 

What does the design and specification of my Solar PV System involve?


Accredited Designers / Installers to be eligible for government rebates, the designer and installer of your solar PV system must be accredited by the Clean Energy Council.

All Solargain design and Installation teams are fully accredited.

The Clean Energy Council’s accreditation scheme ensures that accredited designers and installers of solar PV power systems:
• have undergone the necessary professional training
• follow industry best practice
• adhere to Australian standards
• routinely update their skills and product knowledge.

A Solargain accredited designer/installer will provide you with a solar PV system design and specification.
This will include things such as:
• establishing your electrical loads over an average day using a load analysis
• determining the type of panels
• determining the size of your solar PV system
• deciding the type of inverter
• establishing the location of solar panels in relation to angles, available sunlight, shading and temperature.

 

Environmental Benefit

What is my carbon saving?

A typical 3kW Solar Energy System will offset the following over a 25-year period:

  • 180,000 lbs of CO2 (greenhouse gas)
  • 600 lbs of NOx (smog)
  • 500 lbs of SO2 (acid rain)
  • 300,000 miles driven in an average car
  • (12,000 miles a year)
  • It's like planting 1.5 acres of Trees
  • It will prevent over 90,000 lbs of Coal from being burned!

 

What is the energy payback time for Solargain Energy System?

There are many factors that will determine the payback period of a solar system. Some of the main factors are listed below.

  • Cost of the System
  • Size of the System
  • System quality and performance
  • Your own energy consumption
  • The current Gov. Feed-In tariff that you are on
  • Annual increases in the cost of energy

 

Why is my inverter not functioning at night?

In the absence of an appropriate amount of sunlight to keep the inverter producing power which most days is around dusk the system will power down and wait until an appropriate amount of light returns the next day, then it will power up again and continue producing.

 

Why does my inverter showing a fault description?

Occasionally the grid experience irregular voltage spikes. Your inverter has safety mechanism built in to shut down your inverter under this condition.

We recommend monitoring your inverter over night as they generally auto reset. If this problem persists, please feel free to use the fault request form www.solargain.com.au/solar-power-system-faults or call our service department to arrange an onsite visit or inspection on 1300 73 93 55.